How the Pattern Made It To Your Favorite Magazine

Wednesday, November 20, 2013



The process of a pattern making it into a magazine for you to get inspired to pick up some yarn and a hook has a varied process, but many professional hands are involved.
It begins with an idea; a designer swatch up some yarn and writes up an explanation of their idea and submits it to a magazine editor. The editor considers the idea, and how it works with the other designs under consideration to create a magazine that meets their audiences need. Upon accepting the design they submit an offer to the designer and a contract is created.
The designer now writes the pattern and creates a sample for photographing. Many designers approach this differently, some make up the sample as they write the pattern, some write the pattern and hire a contract crocheter to create the sample for them, some have a hybrid of these approaches, but the pattern has to be written and the sample has to be created.
However the process does not end there, the pattern and sample are now shipped to the magazine editor by the deadline, where the sample is photographed and the pattern is sent to a tech Editor to be reviewed for accuracy. The tech Editor goes over the entire math in the pattern and formats the pattern to the magazine standards so that the publication has an easy read and flow to it. They may also draw up charts or graphs for the pattern. Essentially they are attempting to ensure that what the designer has written is as understandable and as accurate as possible to ensure that the project can be successfully completed by the widest audience.
The photographer in the mean time is setting up shots that give the most information about the design, showing it in its best light, addressing set up of the shot with any props, making sure that the colors work for an eye catching image, as well as addressing the highlights and unique details of the project.
Then it all goes to the hands of the publishing team. They set the page outlines, and put the magazine to print; it goes to distribution and makes it to your mailbox or newsstand.
Many hands create the instructions that adorn your imagination; you may have a part to contribute in the process yourself. CGOA offers assistance in being a professional in the crochet field, so if you are so inclined visit CGOA and check out the “Learn” tab for more details.

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